Armenia: Stories on the genocide II

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Some fragments of an interview I had with an Armenian man in his late fifties, living in a town near Yerevan (april 2015).


 

When i think about what happened to our people in 1915 -and before that and after that – i feel physically sick. It is an unmeasurable tragedy and pain we can hardly digest. There are no words to describe it, no recompense thinkable. But all this focus on Turkey recognizing the genocide -something they probably won’t do- puts to much attention on them and their shortcomings.  We are held hostage by this and it will not take us anywhere. It is humilliating. We need to refocus on ourselves and stop being put down by  Turcs, Russians or whomever. We are able and free to not depend on their outlook on us, the Armenians.

I also think that this enormous tragedy that has hit all of us, this genocide, is used -or misused- politically. And i dont think that is a good thing. I grew up as an Armenian in the Soviet Union, and i was ‘forced’ to live together with Turcs/Azeris who are according to our history our greatest enemies.  I served the soviet army and was stationned in Baku, and in my personal experience I have only met warm and friendly people there. Some have become lifelong friends. I have a hard time relating these people to the brutal killings of our parents. My children, who are growing up in an independant Armenia see things different they seem to hate all Turcs all Azeris. They keep talking about a free Karabach, an Armenian Karabach. I never heard of ‘our’ Karabach when i was that was growing up.

Every 24th of April I diligently commemorate the 1.5 million victims of the 1915 genocide. My heart is with them, with our fathers and mothers who have suffered immensely and ferociously. This should not be outshadowed by political issues that will only bring more and more victims among our people.

 

 

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